Structural Genomics


Structural Genomics

We identify structures in the genome using large DNA molecules. Structures can be repetitive regions or unique regions of the genome. Our interest lies in how genomes are different in large regions. We use high-molecular weight (HWM) DNA that is meticulously extracted to preserve length and not break the DNA more than necessary (>150 kb). The DNA is nicked-labeled-and-repaired to produce unique patterns that can be visualized as single molecules in nano-channels (BioNano Genomics). The unique and repetitive patterns are assembled by comparing molecules one-to-another to identify overlaps. The assembled overlapping molecules result in an 'assembly' or a map of how the genome is constructed. By comparing two different assemblies, we can identify meaningful structural variants.

The website provides resources to researchers using BioNano technology and it also provides public data to researchers working on different genomes. Here we provide a repository where this data can be accessed and used. It mostly contains plant datasets including cotton, aspen, apple, rice, peanut, and others.